Chief Anderson’s life goal was to promote the spirit and love of aviation; especially to young people.  Chief’s contribution to America was important to the success of many civil and military aviators. His legacy continues to inspire and shape the careers of young aviators today.
The C. Alfred “Chief” Anderson Legacy Foundation’s vision is to preserve Chief Anderson’s original historical artifacts and share his legacy as the Chief Flight Instructor for the Tuskegee Airmen with the world.
For many years Chief Anderson managed and operated the Summer Flight Academy for Negro Airmen International (NAI), an organization he helped found. During the summer in Alabama, young aviators from all over America were able to gain valuable college credits while enjoying the wonders of flight.

 

From the Blog

Jack & Jill of Augusta Chapter STEM Trip to Tuskegee Airmen Historical Site

Jack & Jill of Augusta Chapter STEM Trip to Tuskegee Airmen Historical Site

The Jack and Jill of America, Incorporated was formed during the Great Depression. It was formed in 1938 by Af...

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“Father of Black Aviation” Postage Stamp

“Father of Black Aviation” Postage Stamp

In January 1941, the Army unveiled its plans to launch a segregated flying training squadron at Tuskegee....

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A Commemoration at Moton Field

A Commemoration at Moton Field

On Saturday, February 15, 2014, the C. Alfred "Chief" Anderson Foundation will participate in the opening Hangar 2...

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Chief Anderson’s Legacy Returns Home To Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Chief Anderson’s Legacy Returns Home To Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Born in 1907, Anderson is believed to have lived with his parents on the Miss Wright’s School and all girls p...

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“The first thing she said was, 'I always heard colored people couldn't fly airplanes, but I see you're flying all around here.' And then she said, 'I'm just going to have to take a flight with you.' Of course all her escorts ran out there and they were all very much opposed to it - 'No Mrs. Roosevelt! You can't do that!' Well she just made up her mind she was going to do it and got in the airplane. You don't argue with the First Lady, so we took off and made the flight, and then when we got back down she said, 'Well, I see you can fly all right!' It wasn't long after that that President Roosevelt's administration decided to have this program called the 'Tuskegee Experiment".–C. Alfred "Chief" Anderson, flight with Eleanor Roosevelt, March 1941

 

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